Tag Archives: plantations

Road Trip Part Three

This is the last of the road trip pictures from weekend before last. I haven’t posted half of what we saw because there just isn’t enough time on the blog, but needless to say the trip was well worth the time.

We left Donaldsonville and headed further north, taking roads neither of us had ever been on before. My mom used to drive truck so there’s a lot of the state she’s seen and it’s a major bonus to find a place she’s never been before.

Passing through the town of White Castle, we took a gorgeous picture of Nottoway Plantation. I’ve been to this plantation years ago and it looks like they’ve added to it. Gorgeous, huh? Ghost Lab did a paranormal investigation of this property a couple of years ago and I want to say they did find evidence of unexplained activity.

Next we found Tally-Ho Plantation in Bayou Goula which is a private owned residence. The house here was once the overseer’s home because the plantation burned down in 1945. It’s a gorgeous house, I think.

Somewhere in the Bayou Goula area (I can’t remember exactly where now), we stumbled across this little church. It was so unexpected, I stopped in the middle of the road so we could get a picture of it. This 8’x8′ church was built in 1903 by a poor sugar can farmer after he successfully prayed to the Virgin Mary for the recovery of his eldest son. Cool, huh?

Then we found our way up to Plaquemine, Louisiana. Plaquemine was settled as early as 1775. There are a lot of old homes in the downtown area and we managed to snag a couple of pictures. It isn’t so easy to stop in this area since the area is so busy. I was able to pull over so Mom could hop out and get this picture.

From there, we went up and around in what seemed like a never-ending loop until we ended up on the Morganza. The Morganza Spillway is where the flood control structure between the Mississippi River and the Atchafalaya River is located. If you recall last year with the flooding of the Mississippi, this area was creating national headlines as it’s the only thing that protected the lower Louisiana parishes from flooding completely. We couldn’t get out to take a picture, but we got one from the road on top of the flood gates.

And that’s the trip. It was a lot of fun. We went north following one river (the Mississippi) and came back home following another (the Atchafalaya). If you ever get the chance to visit south Louisiana, try to take some time out to explore the smaller areas. There’s beauty in nearly every corner of the state and we’d love to show it to you!


Filed under Inspiration

Road Trip: Part One

I love to roder. Yesterday, with the sun shining brightly and it not being too hot, I kidnapped my mom and hit the road for a little sightseeing. She didn’t complain at all. She grabbed her camera and was ready before I was.

It’s funny really. I had no idea where we were going. That’s the best part of rodering, traveling without any destination in mind. At first, I thought we’d just explore River Road (the highway that follows the Mississippi River), but we ended up doing a lot more than that. In fact, we did so much and took so many pictures, I’m going to do this first road trip in parts. Yes, I said first because we decided we’re going to try to do this once or twice a month.

We headed east from our house, driving through the small communities of Choupic (pronounced shoe-pick), Chackbay, and Vacherie (vash-a-ree) to get to River Road.

This is a sugar mill we passed on our way to Choupic. Sugar cane is one of Louisiana’s endangered industries. At one time, there were more sugar cane fields than neighborhoods, but over the years, more land is sold for development. Sugar cane mills are slowly going out of business due to population growth and imported sugar. 

Then we were in the community of Choupic and Chackbay. Every year they have a Gumbo Festival, but I think we missed it.





It’s a pretty area with lots of traditional Acadian style homes and cypress trees.



If you ever get the chance to visit the area, you should take the back roads since they provide you with plenty of things to see.



Next we headed for River Road, which as most people know is where the big plantation homes are. We didn’t do any tours, but we did take as many pictures of the homes, public and private, as we could.

We actually passed on taking a picture of Oak Alley Plantation since they were having their festival and a race. The traffic wouldn’t allow for a stop and shoot (of the photographic kind). I think Oak Alley is popular enough though, that you’re not missing out.

This is, I believe, St. Joseph Plantation. This home is just before Oak Alley if you’re coming from the south. Apparently the home is still part of an active sugar cane farm and tours are available.

We followed River Road for several miles before taking a small break at the foot of the Sunshine Bridge. The Sunshine Bridge, named for Louisiana Governor Jimmie Davis, was the only bridge across the Mississippi River between New Orleans and Baton Rouge. Unfortunately, it emptied into a swamp. I remember one of my college professors telling us that before the Sunshine Bridge was built, the East bank of the Mississippi didn’t have Nutria Rats.

This is a nutria rat. No, we didn't see any on our trip.

We got back on River Road and wound our way along the crooked Mississippi, leaving the Sunshine Bridge far behind us. Except when we got about ten miles down the road, we looked back and saw this:

It just goes to show how winding the Mississippi River is.

So that’s the first part of our road trip. I have several more pictures during our trip to Donaldsonville, Louisiana and further north, but I don’t want to crash anyone’s machine. I’ll pick up the story again tomorrow.

Hope you’ll stop by to see more pictures!



Filed under Inspiration